Helpful Charts

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Charts:

Nutritional Targets
Raw Vegetable Serving Chart
Cooked Vegetable Serving Chart
Lean Serving Chart
Meat Substitutes

More Tips:

General Doctoring of the Foods

 Charts
The following tables have useful data for your Lean and Green portions. They are compilations of data from the USDA, which you can look up for yourself at http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/. NS cites using the USDA database as their source for nutritional information. If you ever want to know if an item would be legal on MF you can ask NS (Nutrition Support) or you can look it up at the USDA site to get an idea of if it would be legal or not.

Nutritional Targets
If you’re eating your 5 MF meals a day, you’re getting all your vitamins and minerals. After that, you’re basically targeting your calories/carbs (limiting them to keep yourself in ketosis), your protein (to keep yourself from losing muscle mass) and fat (to protect your cardiovascular system). Nutrition Support cites the following guidelines: Top of Page

Item

Amount

Measure

Calories

800-1000

kcal

Protein

70-110

grams

Carbohydrates

85-100

grams

Fat

25-35

grams

It is, in fact, important to keep yourself above 800 calories and below 100g carbs in order to maintain an efficient fat burning state. It is also important to get enough protein to protect your muscles (including important muscles like your heart!)

Under 800 calories can cause your body to think it is starving. When your body comes to that conclusion, it will become very conservative and slow down your metabolism to try and make your fat stores last as long as possible. This will manifest in a DECREASE in your rate of weight loss.

This is counter-intuitive in that people associate losing weight with taking in less calories. However, we’ve evolved over millions of years and during that evolution, our bodies have adapted to “feast or famine”. When calories are abundant, our bodies will store them up as fat. When they’re scarce, our bodies will try to stretch out whatever it has available so that it lasts as long as possible. The key to an efficient fat burning state is to make sure your body realizes that it’s getting everything that it really needs to survive long term. Part of that is the vitamins and minerals that are provided in the MF meals and part of that is ensuring you’re getting enough calories to comfort your body that it’s not in a situation where it’s starving.

Under 100g of carbs is the key to staying in FB. Your body will continue to burn fat for energy as long as it doesn’t think it has enough carbohydrates to use as its main fuel source.

Of course, these numbers are based on the average human physiology and specific numbers may vary. However, it’s very difficult to discern any one person’s tolerances for each of these numbers and therefore these are given as a guideline.

If you have a lot of muscle mass or are a very active person, you may need to have a different set of targets. It is best to discuss this type of specialized situation with your physician to ensure that you get the adequate nutrition for your particular situation.

Raw Vegetable Serving Chart
Medifast has recommendations of 1 ½ cups of cooked vegetables or 2 cups of salad greens and ½ cup of other veggies to make a salad. It’s often difficult to gauge what the measure of a vegetable is in terms of cups (try stuffing lettuce into a measuring cup without rendering it unappetizing, so weight becomes a better measure. Here is a table that provides a convenient conversion as well as the nutritional information: Top of Page

Raw

Calories
(kcal)

Protein
(g)

Carbs
(g)

Fat
(g)

Item

Cups

Grams

Alfalfa Sprouts

0.5

16.5

4.0

0.7

0.4

0.1

Asparagus

0.5

67.0

17.0

1.5

2.6

0.1

Broccoli (chopped)

0.5

45.5

15.0

1.3

3.0

0.5

Broccoli Raab (chopped)

0.5

20.0

4.0

0.6

0.6

0.1

Cabbage (chopped)

0.5

44.5

12.0

1.0

2.7

0.0

Cabbage, Red (chopped)

0.5

44.5

14.0

0.6

3.3

0.1

Cauliflower

0.5

50.0

16.3

1.3

3.4

0.1

Celery

0.5

50.5

8.0

0.4

1.5

0.1

Cucumber (peeled, sliced)

0.5

59.5

7.1

0.4

1.3

0.1

Cucumber (with peel, sliced)

0.5

26.0

4.0

0.2

0.9

0.1

Eggplant (cubed)

0.5

41.0

9.8

0.4

2.3

0.1

Green Beans

0.5

55.0

17.0

1.0

3.9

0.0

Green Peppers (chopped)

0.5

74.5

15.0

0.6

3.5

0.1

Red Peppers (chopped)

0.5

74.5

19.0

0.7

4.5

0.2

Yellow Peppers (chopped)

0.5

93.0

25.0

0.9

5.6

0.2

Collards (chopped)

0.5

18.0

5.0

0.4

1.0

0.1

Kale

0.5

33.5

17.0

1.1

3.4

0.2

Mushrooms (MF listing, an avg)

0.5

48.0

10.6

1.5

1.6

0.2

Oyster

0.5

74.0

26.0

2.5

4.8

0.3

Brown, Italian or Crimini

0.5

43.5

12.0

1.1

1.8

0.0

Enoki (sliced)

0.5

32.5

14.0

0.8

2.5

0.1

Maitake (diced)

0.5

35.0

13.0

0.7

2.4

0.1

Portabella (diced)

0.5

43.0

11.0

1.1

2.2

0.1

Shirataki

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

White (sliced)

0.5

35.0

8.0

1.1

1.2

0.1

Mustard greens

0.5

28.0

25.4

0.8

1.4

0.1

Okra

0.5

50.0

16.0

1.0

3.5

0.1

Onion (sliced)

0.5

57.5

23.0

0.6

5.4

0.1

Radishes (slices)

0.5

58.0

9.0

0.4

2.0

0.1

Scallions (aka green onions)

0.5

50.0

44.9

0.9

3.7

0.1

Salad Greens (cos/romaine)

2.0

94.0

16.0

1.2

3.1

0.3

Salad Greens (iceberg/crisphead)

2.0

144.0

20.0

1.3

4.3

0.2

Salad Greens
(butterhead/boston/bib)

2.0

110.0

14.0

1.5

2.5

0.2

Spinach

0.5

15.0

3.0

0.4

0.5

0.1

Squash

0.5

56.5

9.0

0.8

1.9

0.1

Summer (listing for "all")

0.5

56.5

9.0

0.7

1.9

0.1

Zucchini (with skin, chopped)

0.5

62.0

10.0

0.8

2.1

0.1

Crookneck/Straightneck (sliced)

0.5

65.0

12.0

0.6

2.6

0.2

Winter (listing for "all")

0.5

58.0

20.0

0.6

5.0

0.1

Butternut

0.5

70.0

32.0

0.7

8.2

0.1

Spaghetti

0.5

50.5

16.0

0.3

3.5

0.3

Acorn

0.5

70.0

28.0

0.6

7.3

0.1

Tomato

0.5

90.0

16.2

0.6

3.5

0.2

Cherry (whole)

0.5

74.5

13.0

0.7

2.9

0.2

Red (sliced)

0.5

90.0

16.0

0.8

3.3

0.2

Sun dried

0.5

27.0

70.0

3.8

15.0

0.8

Turnip Greens

0.5

27.5

9.0

0.4

2.0

0.1

Turnips (cubed)

0.5

65.0

18.0

0.6

4.2

0.1

The bolded, italicized entries in the table indicate values that are quite high in carbohydrates. They are not necessarily recommended by NS, but they are included for informational value. If you are monitoring your carbs and calories closely enough, you can use them and not throw yourself out of FB. However, following the simplistic “½ Cup of a veggie in addition to your 2 cups of a salad green” approach that is cited with the 5 & 1 plan should not include these items due to a higher carbohydrate value.

Fat Free salad dressings that are less than 6 carbs for 2 Tblspns are acceptable. The Wishbone Salad Spritzers are ideal for this as they distribute the dressing around rather than having it pool up in one area…letting you use less of it overall while still getting dressing on every piece of the salad.

Cooked Vegetable Serving Chart
Cooked vegetables have a significant difference in size then raw vegetables. Specifically, you can pack a lot more of a cooked vegetable into the same unit of volume (like a measuring cup) than you can a raw vegetable. Therefore, the values for cooked vegetables differ than raw vegetables. The following table indicates the method of cooking, volume, weight and nutritional information for cooked vegetables: Top of Page

Cooked

Calories

Protein

Carbs

Fat

Item

Method

Cups

Grams

Alfalfa Sprouts

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Asparagus

Boiled, drained

1.5

135.0

30.0

3.2

5.6

0.3

Broccoli (chopped)

Boiled, drained

1.5

117.0

33.0

3.5

5.9

0.4

Broccoli Raab (chopped)

Boiled, drained

1.5?

51.4

17.0

2.0

1.6

0.3

Cabbage (chopped)

Boiled, drained

1.5

225.0

52.0

2.9

12.4

0.1

Cabbage, Red (chopped)

Boiled, drained

1.5

225.0

65.0

3.4

15.6

0.2

Cauliflower

Boiled, drained

1.5

186.0

43.0

3.4

7.6

0.8

Celery

Boiled, drained

1.5

225.0

40.0

1.9

9.0

0.4

Cucumber (peeled, sliced)

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Cucumber (with peel, sliced)

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Eggplant (cubed)

Boiled, drained

1.5

148.5

52.0

1.2

13.0

0.3

Green Beans

Boiled, drained

1.5

187.5

66.0

3.5

14.8

0.5

Green Peppers (chopped)

Boiled, drained

1.5

276.0

75.0

2.5

18.0

0.6

Red Peppers (chopped)

Boiled, drained

1.5

276.0

75.0

2.5

18.0

0.6

Yellow Peppers (chopped)

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Collards (chopped)

Boiled, drained

1.5

285.0

74.0

6.0

14.0

1.0

Kale

Boiled, drained

1.5

195.0

55.0

3.7

11.0

0.8

Mushrooms
(MF listing, an avg)

Boiled, drained

1.5

234.0

66.0

5.1

12.4

1.1

Oyster

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Brown, Italian or Crimini

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Enoki (sliced)

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Maitake (diced)

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Portabella (diced)

Grilled

1.5

181.5

64.0

7.6

8.9

1.4

Shirataki

Stir fried

1.5?

217.0

104.0

7.5

16.7

0.8

White (sliced)

Stir fried

1.5

162.0

42.0

5.8

6.5

0.5

Mustard greens

Boiled, drained

1.5

210.0

32.0

4.8

4.4

0.5

Okra

Boiled, drained

1.5

240.0

53.0

4.5

10.8

0.5

Onion (sliced)

Boiled, drained

1.5

315.0

132.0

4.3

30.1

0.6

Radishes (slices)

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Scallions (aka green onions)

Boiled, drained

1.5

150.0

48.0

2.8

11.0

0.3

Salad Greens (cos/romaine)

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Salad Greens
(iceberg/crisphead)

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Salad Greens
(butterhead/boston/bib)

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Spinach

Boiled, drained

1.5

270.0

62.0

8.0

10.1

0.7

Squash

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Summer (listing for "all")

Boiled, drained

1.5

270.0

54.0

2.5

11.6

0.8

Zucchini (with skin, chopped)

Boiled, drained

1.5

334.5

57.0

3.9

11.9

0.4

Crookneck/Straightneck
(sliced)

Boiled, drained

1.5

270.0

54.0

2.5

11.6

0.8

Winter (listing for "all")

Boiled, drained
or baked

1.5

307.5

120.0

2.7

26.9

1.9

Butternut

Boiled, drained
or baked

1.5

307.5

123.0

2.8

32.3

0.3

Spaghetti

Boiled, drained
or baked

1.5

232.5

63.0

1.5

15.0

0.6

Acorn

Baked

1.5

307.5

172.0

3.4

44.8

0.4

Tomato

"cooked"

1.5

360.0

65.0

3.4

14.4

0.4

Cherry (whole)

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Red (sliced)

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Sun dried

 

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Turnip Greens

Boiled, drained
or baked

1.5

216.0

43.0

2.5

9.4

0.5

Turnips (cubed)

Boiled, drained
or baked

1.5

234.0

51.0

1.7

11.8

0.2

The bolded, italicized entries in the table indicate values that are quite high in carbohydrates. They are not necessarily recommended by NS, but they are included for informational value. If you are monitoring your carbs and calories closely enough, you can use them and not throw yourself out of FB. However, following the simplistic “1 ½ Cup of a veggie” approach that is cited with the 5 & 1 plan should not include these items due to a higher carbohydrate value.

Lean Serving Chart

Item

Portion

Calories

Carbs

Protein

Fat

Beef Steak

5 oz

277.0

0.0

43.0

10

Chicken Breast

7 oz

220.0

0.0

45.0

2

Ground Turkey *

5 oz

333.0

0.0

38.8

18.6

Turkey Roast Dark

7 oz

371.0

0.0

56.7

14.3

Tuna

7 oz

275.6

0.0

59.4

2.4

Lobster

7 oz

194.0

2.0

40.0

2

Swordfish

7 oz

308.0

0.0

52.0

9

Scallop

7 oz

224.0

0.0

49.0

0

Crab

7 oz

191.0

0.0

37.0

2

*Ground meat (any ground meat, even turkey) is generally less healthy than unprocessed meat. This is because when they grind the meat, they use fattier portions and it’s much less controlled. This leads to juicer meat, but it’s that way because of the added fat. According to Nutrition Support, 97% lean ground turkey is okay to use, up to 5oz as long as you log it according to the nutritional value on the package. Top of Page

Meat Substitutes
Sometimes you simply may not want meat for your Lean or you may be a vegetarian/vegan. MF accommodates this by allowing substitution for meat as cited in the following table where each row constitutes 1 Lean portion:

Meat Subtitutes

 

 

Item

Qty

Measure

Low-fat Cheese

0.75-1

Cup

Eggs

2

Each

Egg substitute

0.5 - 1

Cup

Firm tofu

0.5

Block

Soft tofu

4x2

Inches

Low-fat cottage cheese

0.5-1

Cup

Boca burger

1

Each

Morning Star burger

1

Each

General Doctoring Options

Just looking at the Medifast (MF) program, it looks interesting and like something you could swing. Once your on it, though, you may look for ways to vary your menu. There’s a bunch of options for Medifast meals and you may well be happy with all of them. Chances are, though, that there will be some you love and some you hate…limiting your menu in a hurry.

To overcome that limitation, Medifasters (MFers) can “doctor” their meals. Basically, this means adding various things to your meals to make them tastier. Additionally, there’s quite a bit of playing that can be done with your Lean and Green meal to achieve different menus and keep things from getting stale.

First, you should be aware of a few key things that are not discussed in the Medifast Quick Start Guide:

  1. Shirataki noodles. These are a yam/tofu based pasta-like product. They are not traditional pasta, by any means, but they will do in a pinch. And Medifasting counts as being in a pinch! You can get them in some stores (Asian stores seem to have them), but online tends to be only sure fire way to find them. Some places online:

    http://www.miraclenoodle.com/
    http://www.konjacfoods.com/

    The consensus seems to be to stick with the angel hair version. 1 ½ cups of these noodles equals 1 Green.
    They have a fishy smell when coming out of the package, so.. rinse and drain them a few times, microwave for 1 minute, then drain again, or soak up water with a paper towel. You can use them as noodles or dice them up to make “rice”.
    It is, though, advisable to get the trial size and ensure you like them. Many people simply can’t tolerate the smell and won’t use them.

  2. Walden Farms. This is a company specializing in low (usually zero) calorie/carb items. They can be found online at http://www.waldenfarms.com/. Not all items are zero cals/carbs, so be mindful of what you’re getting.
  3. Sugar Free Syrups. There’s a ton of options out there for adding flavor to your foods. Torino and DaVinci each make a bunch of syrups you can use while on the program. DaVinci can be found at http://www.davincigourmet.com/products/sugar_free_flavored_syrups/. These are not completely freebee’s, and should be limited, as per Nutrition Support guidelines, to 4 tablespoons per day.
  4. Butter/Olive Oil Sprays. A wonderful way to add flavor to your food. I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter spray seems to be a favorite among MFers. NS recommends limiting it to 5 sprays. There’s other flavored sprays out there, just make sure you’re counting any calories/carbs you’re putting into your food.
  5. True Lemon/True Lime. A great way to add a citrus flavor to your food with 0 carbs/cals. Visit http://www.truelemon.com/.

Second, use the support mechanisms available to you. Support in Motion is a great place for you to track your progress, log the meals you eat, your exercise, weight, measurements, etc. AND IT’S FREE! Visit www.tsflsupportinmotion.com and sign up.Top of Page